Environment Office team

The Environment Office coordinates and monitors environmental activities on BAS stations and ships and at its headquarters in Cambridge to ensure minimum environmental impact.

Our responsibilities

  • Developing and implementing BAS environmental policy
  • Coordinating the Environmental Management System, registered to ISO14001
  • Meeting the requirements of the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty (1998) and the Antarctic Act (1994)
  • Carrying out Environmental Impact Assessments for all projects
  • Protecting and conserving historic BAS stations
  • Preparing an Annual Environmental Report
  • Organising the safe and proper disposal of waste
  • Organising fuel spill response and contingency planning

The day-to-day responsibility for environmental and waste management in the Antarctic lies with the Station Leaders, Ship Captains and Field Leaders, but Environment Office staff spend at least part of each summer field season in the Antarctic making environmental inspections or audits of BAS research stations and vessels, as well as leading environmental projects, such as the clean-up of abandoned facilities.

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Rachel Clarke

Senior Environmental Manager

clathe

Clare Fothergill

Project Manager Rothera Modernisation

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Kevin Hughes

Environ. Research and Monitoring

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Anna Malaos

Senior Environmental Manager




NEWS STORY: Antarctic conservation issues

13 July, 2012

Challenges facing the future of Antarctica A century ago, Antarctica was one of Earth’s last frontiers, but now the continent is under threat from human activity. An international team of …


Global connectivity of Southern Ocean ecosystems

4 August, 2021 by Chester Sands, David Barnes, Eugene Murphy, Geraint Tarling, Jennifer Jackson, Kevin Hughes, Nadine Johnston, Phil Trathan, Richard Phillips, Rachel Cavanagh, Ryan Saunders, Sally Thorpe

Southern Ocean ecosystems are globally important. Processes in the Antarctic atmosphere, cryosphere, and the Southern Ocean directly influence global atmospheric and oceanic systems. Southern Ocean biogeochemistry has also been shown…

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Developing resilience to climate change impacts in Antarctica: an evaluation of Antarctic Treaty System protected area policy

5 June, 2021 by John Turner, Kevin Hughes, Peter Convey

Antarctica is increasingly vulnerable to climate change impacts, with the continent predicted to warm by ∼4 °C by 2100 under a ‘business as usual’ greenhouse gas emission scenario. Simultaneously, human…

Read more on Developing resilience to climate change impacts in Antarctica: an evaluation of Antarctic Treaty System protected area policy

Ecosystem services in Antarctica: Global assessment of the current state, future challenges and managing opportunities

1 June, 2021 by Kevin Hughes, Susie Grant

Antarctic ecosystem services are rich and diverse and include global climate modulation, biodiversity and habitat protection, cultural heritage, scientific knowledge, education and recreation as well as the extraction of marine…

Read more on Ecosystem services in Antarctica: Global assessment of the current state, future challenges and managing opportunities

The effectiveness of Virkon® S disinfectant against the invasive chironomid Eretmoptera murphyi and implications for Antarctic biosecurity practices

1 February, 2021 by Kevin Hughes, Peter Convey

The flightless midge Eretmoptera murphyi is thought to be continuing its invasion of Signy Island via the treads of personnel boots. Current boot-wash biosecurity protocols in the Antarctic region rely…

Read more on The effectiveness of Virkon® S disinfectant against the invasive chironomid Eretmoptera murphyi and implications for Antarctic biosecurity practices

Ocean currents as a potential dispersal pathway for Antarctica’s most persistent non-native terrestrial insect

1 January, 2021 by Kevin Hughes, Peter Convey, Sally Thorpe

The non-native midge Eretmoptera murphyi is Antarctica’s most persistent non-native insect and is known to impact the terrestrial ecosystems. It inhabits by considerably increasing litter turnover and availability of soil…

Read more on Ocean currents as a potential dispersal pathway for Antarctica’s most persistent non-native terrestrial insect

Invasive non‐native species likely to threaten biodiversity and ecosystems in the Antarctic Peninsula region

1 April, 2020 by David Vaughan, David Barnes, Jonathan Shanklin, Kevin Hughes, Peter Convey, Simon Morley

The Antarctic is considered to be a pristine environment relative to other regions of the Earth, but it is increasingly vulnerable to invasions by marine, freshwater and terrestrial non‐native species.…

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Combining correlative and mechanistic niche models with human activity data to elucidate the invasive potential of a sub‐Antarctic insect.

1 March, 2020 by Kevin Hughes, Peter Convey

Aim Correlative species distribution models (SDMs) are subject to substantial spatio‐temporal limitations when historical occurrence records of data‐poor species provide incomplete and outdated information for niche modelling. Complementary mechanistic modelling…

Read more on Combining correlative and mechanistic niche models with human activity data to elucidate the invasive potential of a sub‐Antarctic insect.

Thirty years of marine debris in the Southern Ocean: annual surveys of two island shores in the Scotia Sea

1 March, 2020 by Claire Waluda, Iain Staniland, Kevin Hughes, Mari Whitelaw, Michael Dunn, Sally Thorpe

We report on three decades of repeat surveys of beached marine debris at two locations in the Scotia Sea, in the Southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Between October…

Read more on Thirty years of marine debris in the Southern Ocean: annual surveys of two island shores in the Scotia Sea

Sources of elevated heavy metal concentrations in sediments and benthic marine invertebrates of the western Antarctic Peninsula

1 January, 2020 by Kevin Hughes, Lloyd Peck

Antarctica is one of the least anthropogenically-impacted areas of the world. Metal sources to the marine environment include localised activities of research stations and glacial meltwater containing metals of lithogenic…

Read more on Sources of elevated heavy metal concentrations in sediments and benthic marine invertebrates of the western Antarctic Peninsula

Human-mediated dispersal of terrestrial species between Antarctic biogeographic regions: a preliminary risk assessment

15 February, 2019 by Kevin Hughes, Peter Convey

The distribution of terrestrial biodiversity within Antarctica is complex, with 16 distinct biogeographic regions (Antarctic Conservation Biogeographic Regions) currently recognised within the Antarctic continent, Peninsula and Scotia Arc archipelagos of…

Read more on Human-mediated dispersal of terrestrial species between Antarctic biogeographic regions: a preliminary risk assessment

Surveys reveal increasing and globally important populations of south polar skuas and Antarctic shags in Ryder Bay (Antarctic Peninsula)

1 February, 2019 by Ali Massey, Janet Silk, Kevin Hughes, Richard Phillips

Despite their importance in ecosystems, population sizes and trends are unknown for many seabirds, including in the Antarctic. Here we report on the first comprehensive survey of south polar skuas…

Read more on Surveys reveal increasing and globally important populations of south polar skuas and Antarctic shags in Ryder Bay (Antarctic Peninsula)

Current logistical capacity is sufficient to deliver the implementation and management of a representative Antarctic protected area system

5 December, 2018 by Kevin Hughes, Susie Grant

Antarctica’s terrestrial ecosystems are vulnerable to impacts resulting from climate change and local human activities. The Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) provides for the designation of protected areas through the Protocol…

Read more on Current logistical capacity is sufficient to deliver the implementation and management of a representative Antarctic protected area system