Variations between winter and summer in the toxicity of copper to a population of the mysid Praunus flexuosus

Copper toxicity was tested on a coastal population of the mysid Praunus flexuosus (Müller) from Southampton Water (Southern England) under winter and summer conditions. Ten-day toxicity tests were performed on the different life-cycle stages (female, male and juvenile) present in winter (December/February) and summer (August). The individuals were in winter or summer physiological condition and were exposed to seawater to which 0, 5, 25, 75 and 200 μg l−1 copper was added. There were significantly different copper toxicity effects in winter and summer. In winter mortality was ≤ 1% at all levels of copper exposure, while in summer identical exposure levels caused mortality of up to 93%. The 96 h LC50 was 30.8 μg l−1 copper added in the summer. In winter, the low mortality prevented calculation of LC50. There were differences in responses to copper between the life-cycle stages. Juveniles were more sensitive than adults, and were severely affected within 24 h. Females were more affected than males at lower doses and shorter exposure times.

Details

Publication status:
Published
Author(s):
Authors: Garnacho, E., Peck, L.S., Tyler, P.A.

On this site: Lloyd Peck
Date:
1 January, 2000
Journal/Source:
Marine Biology / 137
Page(s):
631-636
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
https://doi.org/10.1007/s002270000383