Cenozoic tectonic history of the South Georgia microcontinent and potential as a barrier to Pacific-Atlantic through flow

Cenozoic opening of the central Scotia Sea involved the tectonic translation of crustal blocks to form the North Scotia Ridge, which today is a major topographic constriction to the flow of the deep Antarctic Circumpolar Current that keeps Antarctica thermally isolated from warmer ocean waters. How this ridge developed and whether it was a topographic barrier in the past are unknown. To address this we investigated the Cenozoic history of the South Georgia microcontinental block, the exposed part of the ridge. Detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology data confirm that the Cretaceous succession of turbidites exposed on South Georgia was stratigraphically connected to the Rocas Verdes backarc basin, part of the South America plate. Apatite thermochronometry results show that South Georgia had remained connected to South America until ca. 45–40 Ma; both record a distinct rapid cooling event at that time. Subsequent separation from South America was accompanied by kilometer-scale reburial until inversion ca. 10 Ma, coeval with the cessation of spreading at the West Scotia Ridge and collision between the South Georgia block and the Northeast Georgia Rise. Our results show that the South Georgia microcontinental block could not have been an emergent feature from ca. 40 Ma until 10 Ma.

Details

Publication status:
Published
Author(s):
Authors: Carter, Andrew, Curtis, Mike, Schwanethal, James

Date:
1 April, 2014
Journal/Source:
Geology / 42
Page(s):
299-302
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
https://doi.org/10.1130/G35091.1