The Antarctic Peninsula Continental Margin Northwest of Anvers Island

The Antarctic Peninsula has a dissected central plateau at 1500–2000 m elevation, at present overlain by a few hundred metres of ice which drains into transverse glaciers. On the west coast, there is no significant floating ice shelf N of 67°S. Present ice cover is very restricted compared with the inferred extent of the ice sheet during glacial periods. The snow accumulation rate is more than three times the Antarctic average, indicating a potential for rapid ice-sheet growth. The present-day sea floor on the outer continental shelf is 400–500 m deep and water depth increases steadily inshore from the shelf break.Reference toolsExport citationAdd to PapersOther actionsAbout this Book

Details

Publication status:
Published
Author(s):
Authors: Larter, R. D., Barker, P. F., Pudsey, C. J., Vanneste, L. E., Cunningham, A. P.

Editors: Davies, Thomas A., Bell, Trevor, Cooper, Alan K., Josenhans, Heiner, Polyak, Leonid, Solheim, Anders, Stoker, Martyn S., Stravers, Jay A.

On this site: Robert Larter
Date:
1 January, 1997
Journal/Source:
In: Davies, Thomas A., Bell, Trevor, Cooper, Alan K., Josenhans, Heiner, Polyak, Leonid, Solheim, Anders, Stoker, Martyn S., Stravers, Jay A. (eds.). Glaciated Continental Margins. An atlas of acoustic images, London, Springer, 272-275.
Page(s):
272-275
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-5820-6_92