High-resolution in situ observations of electron precipitation-causing EMIC waves

Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be important drivers of energetic electron losses from the outer radiation belt through precipitation into the atmosphere. While the theoretical possibility of pitch angle scattering-driven losses from these waves has been recognized for more than four decades, there have been limited experimental precipitation observations to support this concept. We have combined satellite-based observations of the characteristics of EMIC waves, with satellite and ground-based observations of the EMIC-induced electron precipitation. In a detailed case study, supplemented by an additional four examples, we are able to constrain for the first time the location, size, and energy range of EMIC-induced electron precipitation inferred from coincident precipitation data and relate them to the EMIC wave frequency, wave power, and ion band of the wave as measured in situ by the Van Allen Probes. These observations will better constrain modeling into the importance of EMIC wave-particle interactions.

Details

Publication status:
Published
Author(s):
Authors: Rodger, Craig J., Hendry, Aaron T., Clilverd, Mark A., Kletzing, Craig A., Brundell, James B., Reeves, Geoffrey D.

On this site: Mark Clilverd
Date:
28 November, 2015
Journal/Source:
Geophysical Research Letters / 42
Page(s):
9633-9641
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
https://doi.org/10.1002/2015GL066581