Assemblages of submarine landforms in the glacial troughs of the northern Barents Sea, east of Svalbard

The Barents Sea is a wide, relatively deep epicontinental sea consisting of shallower banks (c. 50–100 m depth) separated by broad, flat-bottomed troughs (c. 200–400 m depth) that radiate out towards its western and northern margins (Fig. 1a). These troughs have been excavated by grounded ice during multiple glaciations through the Plio-Pleistocene (Jakobsson et al. 2014). During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the Barents Sea Ice Sheet (BSIS) extended across the entire northern Barents Sea to the shelf break (Svendsen et al. 2004; Jakobsson et al. 2014). Fast-flowing ice drained the ice sheet through these troughs and produced a suite of seafloor landforms that preserves both a record of former ice-flow patterns and of how the ice sheet retreated during deglaciation (Dowdeswell et al. 2010; Hogan et al. 2010a).

Details

Publication status:
Published
Author(s):
Authors: Hogan, Kelly A., Dowdeswell, J. A., Noormets, R.

Editors: Dowdeswell, J.A., Canals, M., Jakobsson, M., Todd, B.J., Dowdeswell, E.K., Hogan, K.A.

On this site: Kelly Hogan
Date:
1 January, 2016
Journal/Source:
In: Dowdeswell, J.A., Canals, M., Jakobsson, M., Todd, B.J., Dowdeswell, E.K., Hogan, K.A. (eds.). Atlas of submarine glacial landforms: modern, Quaternary and ancient, London, Geological Society of London, 333-336.
Page(s):
333-336
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
https://doi.org/10.1144/M46.170